• Toya Caldera and Usu Volcano Geopark
  • Itoigawa Geopark
  • San'in Kaigan Geopark
  • Unzen Volcanic Area Geopark
  • Muroto Geopark
  • Mt. Apoi Geopark
  • Minami Alps Geopark
  • Dinosaur Valley Fukui Katsuyama Geopark
  • Oki Islands Geopark
  • Aso Geopark
  • Amakusa Goshoura Geopark
  • Shirataki Geopark
  • Izu Oshima Geopark
  • Kirishima Geopark
  • Oga Peninsula-Ogata Geopark
  • Mt. Bandai Geopark
  • North Ibaraki Geopark
  • Shimonita Geopark
  • Chichibu Geopark
  • Hakusan Tedorigawa Geopark
  • Happou Shirakami Geopark
  • Yuzawa Geopark
  • Choshi Geopark
  • Hakone Geopark
  • Izu Peninsula Geopark
  • Sanriku Geopark
  • Oita Bungo-Ohno Geopark
  • Sikoku-Seiyo Geopark
  • Sado Geopark
  • Sanriku Geopark
  • Sakurajima Kinkowan Geopark
  • Oita Himeshima Geopark
  • Tokachi Shikaoi Geopark
  • Tateyama Kurobe Geopark
  • Nanki Kumano Geopark
  • Amakusa Geopark
  • Naeba-Sanroku Geopark

Global Geoparks

Japanese Geoparks

Currently, as of September 2015, Japanese Geoparks in 39 regions have been acknowledged by the Japan Geopark Committee. In August 2009, at the Global Geopark Network (GGN) Geoparks Conference in Taian, China, the three regions of Toya Caldera and Usu Volcano, Itoigawa, and Unzen Volcanic Area were recognized and made members of the Global Geoparks; in October 2010, at the GGN Geoparks Conference in Lesvos, Greece, San’in Kaigan was recognized and made a member; in September 2011, at the European Geoparks Network Conference in Langesund, Sweden, Muroto was recognized and made a member; in September 2013, at the 3rd Asia-Pacific Geoparks Network Symposium in Jeju, Korea, Oki Islands was recognized and made a member; in September 2014 at the 6th International UNESCO Conference on Global Geoparks in Stonehammer, Canada, Aso was recognized and made a member.